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A Brief History of Hemp in the United States

History of Hemp

Produced by Patagonia

Natural. Misunderstood. Legal. This is the story of the history of hemp in the United States. A forbidden fiber in the U.S. since 1970, hemp has taken the heat for almost five decades. Until the Farm Bill passed in December of 2018, hemp was federally illegal to grow for commercial purposes, making it risky for businesses to invest in a new crop that was incorrectly classified as a drug. Visit Patagonia.com/hemp to learn more.

History of Hemp in the United States

Field of Hemp

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Hemp in Kansas: Questions Remain

hemp plantWhich seed varieties grow well in different parts of Kansas? How much water is needed to grow hemp in Kansas? Where can farmers access certified seed? When the 2018 Farm Bill opened the door to growing industrial hemp—plants that contain less than 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC—it also released the flood gates on questions about how to grow the once-maligned plant. Industrial hemp is often grown for its fiber, seeds and oil, and it contains low levels of THC, the psychoactive that produces a “high.”

But with great hemp power comes great hemp responsibility, and Kansas State Research and Extension agents say their call to action is urgent, based on the high volume of questions they’re already fielding, according to a press release.

Like super heroes on the industrial hemp battle front, scientists including Jason Griffin, director of the John C. Pair Horticulture Center in Haysville, will examine the growing process as well as the business opportunities for farmers. They’ll also investigate where farmers can take their crops for processing, how to and where to obtain crop insurance and how to handle crops that go “hot”—meaning the THC level is above the legal limit.

“Because we are at the very beginning of hemp cultivation in Kansas, there are far more questions than answers,” Griffin says. “The most common questions I am getting at this point are from people just thinking about whether or not they should add hemp to their crop rotation. Should I grow hemp? Can I grow hemp? Where would I get seed? Who is going to buy my hemp?”

1. Do your homework.

2. Understand this is a crop just like any other crop and failure—for many reasons—is a possibility.

3. Know that there is no insurance for your crop, as of this writing.

4. Make sure you and your business partners have a mutual understanding.

5. Don’t invest more than you can afford to lose.

“Hemp likes a warm summer and, in general, is not a heavy water user like other crops,” Griffin says. “There is no question in my mind that we can grow high-quality hemp in Kansas. The biggest question right now is determining what varieties will grow best for us. Hemp is heavily influenced by environmental conditions, and our environment is very different from the states that have been growing hemp for several years. Determining what varieties will grow well for us and stay under the 0.3% THC requirement will be a focus of our research this summer.”

A License to Grow

Rules vary by state, but in Kansas you should expect the following steps:

• State and national criminal background check

• Fingerprinting

• Submission of maps where hemp will be grown from certified seed

Growers will also be required to submit a research proposal, commit to continuous oversight of the crop, and promise to keep unlicensed people from areas where the crops are grown. Check out the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s page on the Industrial Hemp Research Program for updates.

Griffin’s advice, regardless of where you live: First, read and understand your state’s Department of Agriculture rules and regulations on industrial hemp. Second, attend your state’s land grant institution’s hemp field day and ask lots of questions. If your state doesn’t have one, then visit a neighboring state.

“These institutions offer unbiased, research-based information,” Griffin says. “Some for-profit entities may offer training, but their top priority is cashing your check.”

Third, he says, before you put a seed in the ground you should know who is going to buy your crop. Growing a beautiful crop is pointless if you can’t sell it.

“As for stigma, you will still get funny looks and a few laughs, but the joke is on them. Those of us who are adults in the room recognize industrial hemp has arrived and offers farmers another crop to add to their rotation.”

Source: Portia Stewart, Ag Professional

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How Much CBD Should I Take?

While it is known that CBD has many benefits, very little is know about how much CBD one should take.

CBD

This short video offer some helpful guidance around amounts and dosages that could prove helpful.

Mayo Clinic suggests CBD dosages based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, and expert opinion. Cannabinoid dosages and duration of treatment depend mainly on the illness (and countless other factors).

The following chart from Mayo Clinic provides specific dosage recommendations for various illnesses:

  • Loss of Appetite in Cancer Patients: 2.5mg of THC (orally), with or without 1mg of CBD for six weeks. [S]
  • Chronic Pain: 2.5-20mg of CBD [with or without THC] (orally). [S]
  • Epilepsy: 200-300mg of CBD (orally) daily. [S]
  • Movement Problems Due to Huntington’s Disease: 10mg of CBD per kg of body weight daily for six weeks (orally). [S]
  • Sleep Disorders: 40mg-160mg of CBD (orally). [S]
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS) symptoms: Cannabis plant extracts containing 2.5-120 milligrams of a THC/CBD combination daily for 2-15 weeks. Patients typically use eight sprays within any three hours, with a maximum of 48 sprays in any 24-hour period. [S]
  • Schizophrenia: 40-1,280mg oral CBD daily. [S]
  • Glaucoma: A single sublingual CBD dosage of 20-40mg (>40 mg may increase eye pressure). [S]